Friday, April 12, 2013

Review: Pretty Bones by Aya Tsintziras

Pretty Bones
Pretty Bones by Aya Tsintziras
Raine has a family, good grades, best friends, and a boyfriend who loves her. But then anorexia takes over, and her life spirals out of control. Her efforts to hide her condition are finished when she collapses at a school dance. Although she's whisked away to treatment, Raine isn't ready to accept who she really is and get the help she desperately needs. For Raine, coming-of-age means coming closer to death.
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Publishes in US: September 2nd 2011 by James Lorimer and Company 
Genre: YA Contemporary
Source: bought
Series? No.

Buy it: Barnes & Noble   Amazon   IndieBound   BookDepository.com

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   I think that eating disorders and distorted body image is a very important thing to talk about, and I think that Ava handled it well in Pretty Bones. We saw the start, especially where Raine, the main character thought that she was in control of it and could stop when she wanted. Next we have the concerned friends, then the crash that after she keeps on with the disorder, and then the final wake up call where she wants to get help. 
   What my problem was is I didn't see a new or unique twist, I felt like I have read this book before. Don't get me wrong, I am drawn to books like this, and I flew through this one, and the fact that it is pretty short helped that along. I just don't see where it brought something new. 
    I connected with Raine though, because I have been in her shoes, and I still have problems with my body image. It is always about those numbers on the scale, and no matter how thin, you always see fat. Though these days I am on the other end where I eat what I want when I want so that I don't fall into the anorexia or bulemia again. I am trying to just love myself the way that I am and see food as a tool, and not let it rule over me. Size twelve, fourteen, twenty, zero, five or seven should be okay, AS LONG as HEALTHY. I know, I am preaching to the choir, but I have let media, boys, and myself tell me that I am ugly for far to long. 
    Okay, off the soap box. I really do think that Pretty Bones is a good read, and the pacing is good. Nothing felt overly rushed, but I do think that some layers could have been added or expanded on in order to give something new and more fully tell Raine's story. 
   
Bottom Line: Good message

My question to you, my lovely readers:
Are you happy with the way your body is?

33 comments:

  1. I also think topics like this is a great thing to read about and understand more, but it sucks that there wasn't much uniqueness to the book. Awesome review Brandi, I completely understand where you're coming from.

    Janina @ Synchronized Reading

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    1. Yeah, I just needed something to make it feel like I hadn't read it before

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  2. Maybe the book didn't feel personal enough? Too generic? I mean eating disorders are a nightmare and the psychological effects are beyond the roof. I'd hope it would be powerful, sad to hear you didn't connect with the story well.

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    1. I didn't connect with her the best, but I think the originality or lack of is what got me

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  3. I thin issue books are important, but connecting with the character is key if you're going to reach your audience....

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  4. Glad to learn that you feel connected with Raine. For me, the numbers are tools to help us understand where we're at but I guess what can truly make us feel happy isn't something that other people or things can determine. I once read an interesting article, it talked about a lot of what-ifs, and one of them is: if the body is the sacred temple that we reside, won't we feel happy regardless of its shape or size?

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us, Brandi!

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    1. Good quote, and you would think we would, but I know I can feel unhealthy--maybe that has to do twith it

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  5. Oh I think this is a good book to have. Even if it wasn't something new, it's good that it is told over and over to teens especially.

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  6. Thanks for sharing this! I've been looking for titles dealing with eating disorders and I never heard of this one

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  7. I love when books take on serious issues. It's too bad you didn't fully connect with the characters.

    I think know matter what you look like, as a woman, you'll have body image issues. It's just our society and how perfection is everything.

    I know people consider me in shape and thin but as I get closer to 50 all I see is wrinkles, drooping and all that lol

    It's an uphill battle and I wish you the best of luck! Thank you for sharing your story.

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    1. Ah, the uphill battle sounds sad... but the society and media is a lot of pressure

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  8. wow, I knew nothing about this book and when I looked at the cover I thought, something is wrong with that girl, i am glad to see you thought the author handled this difficult subject well.

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    1. Yeah, amazing we can see that but the girl couldn't

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  9. It's great that you connected with Raine and that the book spoke to you. So many women can relate to her struggles with body image, and I'm glad to hear the author handled the message and execution well. Great review!

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  10. you always have books about the most important topics, I'm impressed. I don't know how it happen, but I never have any...But I don't know if this one is for me I confess.

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    1. I dig the contemporary issues so I search for books like this

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  11. I think like this could be a great book, especially if it shows a way out of it, a different way to see things in order to overcome it. But if it is missing something, I don't know how that will affect the message or make others read it.
    I think we all have something we don't like, even if everyone else sees them as perfect. I do see things in my body that I'd like to be different, but I try not to think of them too much.

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    1. Yeah, I think I am own worst judge too

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  12. Another sad/emotional book? Tsk, tsk LOL. You make a great point that we should all love ourselves, it's so so hard with the media nowadays. I find that sometimes books like this can actually make the issue worse because they give tips. I'm not sure if this is one of those but Wintergirl was like that.

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  13. This sounds interesting, but it sounds sad. I can only take so much sad at once! Great review!

    Teresa @ Readers Live A Thousand Lives

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  15. I'm not a fan of books about serious issues/problems, but this book sounds really interesting. It does sounds sad.

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  16. While I don't read as many issue books as I used to, there's definitely a need for them. It's disappointing that this one had nothing new to offer but maybe it will be right for someone out there.

    I do have problems with my body; I'm overweight which doesn't help my asthma at all. I try not to let other people's perceptions affect me but for many years my father was always after me to lose weight and that back when I was a size 14. These days I try to let it roll off me but it can be a challenge.

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    1. It is so hard to deal with what we think about ourselves, much less someone else.

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  17. Not ever. I have major issues with my body, although I'm told that a lot of it is just my perceptions, it doesn't help much really.

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  18. I agree that these issue books are important if they are done right. My issue is mental health. So many times they aren't done right. I think if you tackle an issue like an eating disorder, it's important to include resources for help in the back and maybe where the author got her information on the disease. We all think we know what it's like to have bulimia or anorexia, but do we really?

    Sorry, I take issue with "issue" books. I think they have a responsibility to be accurate with signs and symptoms. Treatments and therapy. I know it's fiction, but in a way, it isn't. And authors need to remember their audience when they write these books. *off soapbox*

    Heather

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  19. Issue books are definitely important for teens. I hear Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson is a good one for this subject. I've read 2 of her other issue books and liked them. Thanks for sharing! :)

    ~Sara @ Forever 17 Books

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    1. I tried that one, but don't do poetry well

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  20. I think there's a time in our lives when most of us will have problems with body image. I've definitely been there. I'm glad you thought this book portrayed a good message. Wonderful review!

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